Supplement: Inositol (Vitamin B8)

Supplement: Inositol (Vitamin B8)

Supplement: Inositol (Vitamin B8)

Inositol (Vitamin B8)

Inositol (Vitamin B8)

Inositol (Vitamin B8)

Other Names:

1,2,3,4,5,6-Cyclohexanehexol, 1,2,5/3,4,6-inositol, (1S)-inositol, (1S)-1,2,4/3,5,6-inositol, Antialopecia Factor, (+)-chiroinositol, cis-1,2,3,5-trans-4,6-Cyclohexanehexol, Cyclohexitol, Dambrose, D-chiro-inositol, D-Myo-Inositol, Facteur Anti-alopécique, Hexahydroxycyclohexane, Inose, Inosite, Inositol Monophosphate, Lipositol, Meso-Inositol, Méso-Inositol, Monophosphate d’Inositol, Mouse Antialopecia Factor, Myo-Inositol, Vitamin B8, Vitamine B8.

Inositol is a vitamin-like substance. It is found in many plants and animals. It can also be made in a laboratory.

Inositol is used for diabetic nerve pain, panic disorder, high cholesterol, insomnia, cancer, depression, schizophrenia, Alzheimer’s disease, attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), autism, promoting hair growth, a skin disorder called psoriasis, and treating side effects of medical treatment with lithium.

Inositol is also used by mouth for treating conditions associated with polycystic ovary syndrome, including failure to ovulate; high blood pressure; high triglycerides; and high levels of testosterone.

Inositol might balance certain chemicals in the body to possibly help with conditions such as panic disorder, depression, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and polycystic ovary syndrome.

Possibly Effective for:

Panic disorder. Inositol shows some promise for controlling panic attacks and the fear of public places or open spaces (agoraphobia). One study found that inositol is as effective as a prescription medication. However, large-scale clinical trials are needed before inositol’s effectiveness for panic attacks can be proven.
Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). There is some evidence that people with OCD who receive inositol by mouth for 6 weeks experience significant improvement.
An ovary disorder known as polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Taking a particular form of inositol (isomer D-chiro-inositol) by mouth seems to lower triglyceride and testosterone levels, modestly decrease blood pressure, and promote ovulation in obese women with polycystic ovary syndrome.
Problems breathing in premature infants known as “acute respiratory distress syndrome,” when given intravenously (by IV).
Psoriasis brought on or made worse by lithium drug therapy. Inositol doesn’t seem to help psoriasis in people not taking lithium.

Possibly Ineffective for:

Schizophrenia.
Alzheimer’s disease.
Autism.
Depression. Limited research suggests that depressed people receiving inositol for 4 weeks may improve at first, but then get worse again after awhile. There was also some expectation that inositol might make antidepressant medications called SSRIs work better. But research so far hasn’t shown this to be true.

Likely Ineffective for:

Nerve problems caused by diabetes.

Insufficient Evidence for:

Attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Early studies suggest inositol might not help improve ADHD symptoms.
Cancer.
Hair growth.
Problems metabolizing fat.
High cholesterol.
Trouble sleeping (insomnia).
Other conditions.
More evidence is needed to rate inositol for these uses.

Inositol is POSSIBLY SAFE for most adults. It can cause nausea, tiredness, headache, and dizziness.

Inositol is POSSIBLY SAFE when used in the hospital for premature infants with acute respiratory distress syndrome.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Not enough is known about the use of inositol during pregnancy and breast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.

Bipolar disorder: There is some concern that taking too much inositol might make bipolar disorder worse. There is a report of a man with controlled bipolar disorder being hospitalized with extreme agitation and impulsiveness (mania) after drinking several cans of an energy drink containing inositol, caffeine, taurine, and other ingredients (Red Bull Energy Drink) over a period of 4 days. It is not known if this is related to inositol, caffeine, taurine, a different ingredient, or a combination of the ingredients.

We currently have no information for INOSITOL Interactions.


Vitamin Supplement Ingredients

Please Note:

Tell all your health care providers about any complementary health practices you use. Give them a full picture of what you do to manage your health. This will help ensure coordinated and safe care.

Disclaimer:

The information presented is believed to be accurate, however, the publisher accepts no responsibility for the accuracy of the information provided, and the reader assumes all risk for its use. These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). These products are not meant to diagnose‚ treat or cure any disease or medical condition. Please consult your doctor before starting any exercise or nutritional supplement program or before using these or any product during pregnancy or if you have a serious medical condition.

About the Author:

McGuinnessPublishing™ is an authoritative source for information about Vitamin Supplement Ingredients and their use. The information provided on this site is intended for your general knowledge only and is not a substitute for professional medical advice or treatment for specific medical conditions. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health care provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. The information on this website is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. Never disregard medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this or any website. We always urge you to consult your doctor before taking any vitamins or supplements due to potential side effects.

Leave A Comment

%d bloggers like this: