Supplement: Nutmeg and Mace (Rou Dou Kou)

Supplement: Nutmeg and Mace (Rou Dou Kou)

Supplement: Nutmeg and Mace (Rou Dou Kou)

Nutmeg and Mace

Nutmeg and Mace

Nutmeg and Mace (Rou Dou Kou)

Other Names:

Fleur de Muscade, Jaatipatree, Jaiphal, Jatikosha, Jatipatra, Jatipatri, Jatiphal, Jatiphala, Jatiphalam, Javitri, Jayapatri, Macis, Muscade, Muscade et Macis, Muscadier, Muskatbuam, Muskatnuss, Myristica, Myristicae Aril, Myristica fragrans, Myristica officinalis, Myristicae Semen, Noix de Muscade, Noix de Muscade et Macis, Nuez Moscada, Nuez Moscada y Macis, Nux Moschata, Ron Dau Kou.

Nutmeg and mace are plant products. Nutmeg is the shelled, dried seed of the plant Myristica fragrans, and mace is the dried net-like covering of the shell of the seed. Nutmeg and mace are used to make medicine.

Nutmeg and mace are used for diarrhea, nausea, stomach spasms and pain, and intestinal gas. They are also used for treating cancer, kidney disease, and trouble sleeping (insomnia); increasing menstrual flow; causing a miscarriage; as a hallucinogen; and as a general tonic.

Nutmeg and mace are applied to the skin to kill pain, especially pain caused by achy joints (rheumatism), mouth sores, and toothache.

In foods, nutmeg and mace are used as spices and flavorings.

In manufacturing, nutmeg oil is used as a fragrance in soaps and cosmetics. Nutmeg oil is distilled from worm-eaten nutmeg seeds. The worms remove much of the starch and fat, leaving the portions of the seed that are rich in oil.

Nutmeg and mace contain chemicals that might affect the central nervous system. Nutmeg and mace might also kill bacteria and fungi.

Insufficient Evidence for:

Producing hallucinations. Eating 5-20 grams of nutmeg powder (1-3 whole seeds) might cause psychoactive effects. Because nutmeg and mace are so similar, high doses of mace might also have psychoactive effects but, as yet, this has not been proven.
Diarrhea.
Stomach problems.
Intestinal gas.
Cancer.
Kidney disease.
Pain.
Other conditions.
More evidence is needed to rate the effectiveness of nutmeg and mace for these uses.

Nutmeg and mace are POSSIBLY SAFE when taken by mouth and used appropriately. Nutmeg and mace are commonly used spices in foods.

It is POSSIBLY UNSAFE to take nutmeg and mace in doses larger than amounts found in foods and for long periods of time. Long-term use of nutmeg in doses of 120 mg or more daily has been linked to hallucinations and other mental side effects. People who have taken larger doses of nutmeg have experienced nausea, dry mouth, dizziness, irregular heartbeat, agitation and hallucinations. Other serious side effects have included death.

Not enough is known about the safety of using nutmeg and mace on the skin.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Nutmeg and mace are POSSIBLY UNSAFE in doses larger than amounts found in foods. In pregnant women, they may cause miscarriages or birth defects.

Not enough is known about the safety of using nutmeg and mace during breast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.

Moderate Interaction. Be cautious with this combination:

Medications changed by the liver (Cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1) substrates) interacts with NUTMEG AND MACE.
Some medications are changed and broken down by the liver. Nutmeg and mace might increase how quickly the liver breaks down some medications. Taking nutmeg and mace along with some medications that are changed by the liver can lead to a variety of effects and side effects. Before taking nutmeg and mace talk to your healthcare provider if you take any medications that are changed by the liver.

Some of these medications that are changed by the liver include chlorzoxazone, theophylline, bufuralol, and others.

Medications changed by the liver (Cytochrome P450 1A2 (CYP1A2) substrates) interacts with NUTMEG AND MACE
Some medications are changed and broken down by the liver. Nutmeg and mace might increase how quickly the liver breaks down some medications. Taking nutmeg and mace along with some medications that are changed by the liver can lead to a variety of effects and side effects. Before taking nutmeg and mace talk to your healthcare provider if you take any medications that are changed by the liver.

Some of these medications that are changed by the liver include clozapine (Clozaril), cyclobenzaprine (Flexeril), fluvoxamine (Luvox), haloperidol (Haldol), imipramine (Tofranil), mexiletine (Mexitil), olanzapine (Zyprexa), pentazocine (Talwin), propranolol (Inderal), tacrine (Cognex), theophylline, zileuton (Zyflo), zolmitriptan (Zomig), and others.

Medications changed by the liver (Cytochrome P450 2B1 (CYP2B1) substrates) interacts with NUTMEG AND MACE.
Some medications are changed and broken down by the liver. Nutmeg and mace might increase how quickly the liver breaks down some medications. Taking nutmeg and mace along with some medications that are changed by the liver can lead to a variety of effects and side effects. Before taking nutmeg and mace talk to your healthcare provider if you take any medications that are changed by the liver.

Medications changed by the liver (Cytochrome P450 2B2 (CYP2B2) substrates) interacts with NUTMEG AND MACE.
Some medications are changed and broken down by the liver. Taking nutmeg and mace along with some medications that are changed by the liver can lead to a variety of effects and side effects. Before taking nutmeg and mace talk to your healthcare provider if you take any medications that are changed by the liver.

Phenobarbital (Luminal) interacts with NUTMEG AND MACE.
The body breaks down phenobarbital (Luminal) to get rid of it. Nutmeg and mace might increase how quickly the body breaks down phenobarbital (luminal). Taking nutmeg and mace along with phenobarbital (luminal) might decrease the effectiveness of phenobarbital (Luminal).

 


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